Lawn & Garden FAQs

We get questions all the time about how to grow a rich, thick, lush lawn. One that’s free of weeds and insects and that looks good in almost any season.  And while every situation is different (shade/sun, quality of soil, drainage) there are some overall items that we have addressed here, that we hope will help  you.  If you have other questions, please contact us and let’s talk about your specific situation.
HOW OFTEN DO I NEED TO WATER MY LAWN?

This will depend on your weather, soil,  grass variety and your lawns health.
During the warmer months a good deep watering once a week, and a top-up lighter watering during hot weather, should be sufficient. During a particularly long dry spell, a few extra deep waterings may be helpful. In Spring and Autumn you may need lighter and less frequent watering. Winter watering is only necessary during dry spells with no rain. Best time of day to water is early morning . Avoid the heat of the day to minimise water loss due to evaporation.

IS THERE AN IDEAL HEIGHT TO MOW A LAWN?

The proper height for mowing your lawn depends on your grass variety, season and growing conditions. Below is a rough guide for the correct mowing heights for the major different varieties of lawn grass:

Grass Variety Lawn Mowing Height
Sir Walter DNA Certified
Buffalo Grass
30-50mm
Sir Grange Zoysia Grass 10-50mm
TifTuf Hybrid Bermuda Grass 10-30mm
Eureka Kikuyu Grass 30-50mm
Platinum Zoysia Grass 20-30mm
ARE SPRINKLERS BETTER THAN JUST USING A HOSE TO WATER MY LAWN?

Use sprinklers and soaker hoses for a more consistent spread of water to your area. Try not to hand-water with a hose, as this will only lead to inconsistencies in your watering.  It’s best to water your lawn in the morning and you’re best off watering when it’s not the heat of the day.  You also don’t want to water at night, as this can cause fungal issues in your lawn.

HOW CAN YOU HELP ME AVOID GETTING GRUBS OR OTHER PESTS IN MY LAWN?

Lawn grubs are common pests in lawns throughout Australia. Lawn grubs are nasty pests for many grass varieties. Lawn grubs can be removed from your lawn with proper methods and treatments. It’s important to keep an eye out for lawn grubs during the warmer months Keep you lawn healthy and fertile with insecticide treatment on a regular basis.
For example, use effective insecticide sprays that can treat lawn grubs. It is very important to follow the manufacturer instructions and apply cautiously to prevent damage to your turf. If this is something you don’t feel comfortable doing, please ring up T & K or contact us here.

IS IT BETTER TO GROW A NEW LAWN FROM SEED OR SHOULD I HAVE YOU INSTALL TURF INSTEAD?

If you have a small area and a bit of money to spare, turf is the quickest and easiest option. For larger areas seed is much cheaper, but be prepared to wait before you can use your lawn. The initial ground preparation is the same whether you are using seed or turf.

CAN YOU MOW MY LAWN ON THE SAME DAY EVERY WEEK?

Yes!  By sticking to a regular mowing and lawn maintenance routine, your lawn will be healthier and be less likely to develop problems that will only cost you more time and money in the long run.

DO YOU COLLECT THE GRASS CLIPPINGS OR MULCH THEM?

Many believe that mulching your lawn and leaving grass clippings on your lawn will create thatch. Grass clippings actually breakdown quite quickly, and are estimated to be made up of 85-95 percent water and they add to the organic layer below your lawn. Grass clippings do act as a natural fertiliser, with beneficial nutrients like potassium, nitrogen and phosphorous. If it’s been a while since you mowed or the length has gotten away from you, then try bringing the height down over a few days so there’s not too much to deal with all at once.

Is one way better than the other?

Some homeowners feel that bagging the lawn creates a cleaner appearance and better curb appeal because no clumps of grass are visible. If you tend to mow less frequently and your clippings are long, it’s best to bag them.   Both bagging  and mulching are good options for a healthy lawn and we leave the decision up to you.

ARE THERE WAYS YOU CAN TREAT MY SOIL TO MAKE MY LAWN GROW AND LOOK BETTER?

Your soil structure plays a vital role in the success of your lawn and in many cases some improvement work is required to get the most out of it. The three main soil types are sandy, loam and clay, with many soils fitting in between these three, a sandy loam or clay loam to give a couple of examples.

For general gardening and lawn purposes you can’t beat a loamy soil, If you are lucky enough a loam soil you won’t have to do much soil improvement work ,  Ideally you need around 150mm of good soil for a successful lawn, at the minimum you could get away with 100mm. If you don’t have the minimum of 100mm to 150mm good soil, you will need to bring in some new soil.

HOW DO YOU TEST THE pH OF MY SOIL?

To ensure that your lawn’s pH is at the right level, we will need to test it. Keep in mind tha this is a soil pH level test and not a lawn test. So you will need to get a soil sample a minimum of  100 mm down that is free from grass, rocks, thatch and anything else but soil. This area of the soil is called the root zone, and it will give you a good indication of the soil’s conditions.

You should also take soil from multiple areas in your lawn, or have a lawn care expert like T & K Lawn and Garden care do a soil test for you, to give you a better idea of the lawn’s health.

DO SUN/SHADE/PARTIAL SUN GRASS SEEDS REALLY WORK AS PROMISED?

Yes! The truth is that there is such a thing as shade tolerant grass. Now, before you get too excited, please understand that no plant can survive without some light. No matter what the claims, there’s no such thing as no-light-ever, deep shade grass.  We can help you figure out what type seed is right for your lawn.

You should also take soil from multiple areas in your lawn, or have a lawn care expert like T & K Lawn and Garden care do a soil test for you, to give you a better idea of the lawn’s health.

I HAVE SOME YELLOW AND WHITE CIRLCES ON MY LAWN WHERE THE GRASS SEEMS TO BE DYING.  WHAT IS THAT?

This is usually a sign that your lawn has a fungal disease. that reveal themselves as brown patches of dead grass in the lawn, as white, yellow, or brown patches or rings that grow in diameter or as thin patches of frayed, distorted, or discoloured grass blades.  Lawn fungus can be brought on by overwatering and soil compaction and can be made worse by a certain combination of air temperatures and humidity.  If you see what you think might be a fungus, it’s best to treat it quickly.